Category Archives: curriculum

The Commitee of Ten 1892

Where 2016 curriculum came from… November 1892

1 Latin
2 Greek
3 English
4 Other Modern Languages
5 Mathematics
6 Science (Physics, astronomy, and chemistry)
7 Natural History (Biology, including botany, zoology, physiology)
8 History, government, and political economy
9 Geography (including physical geography, geology, and meteorology)

FROM:
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF TEN ON SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDIES » WITH THE
REPORTS OF THE CONFERENCES ARRANGED BY THE COMMITTEE, 1894
https://books.google.com/books?id=PfcBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3#v=onepage&q&f=false

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2016 still like 1870

“Even in 1870 we were preparing children to be scholars. Why were they learning Latin and Greek? The answer was that all the “important books” were written in Latin and Greek, but that was never the real answer. Even in 1870 there were books written in English. And, although we don’t make every child learn Latin and Greek any more, we do still make every child algebra.”

Roger Schank

SEE ALSO:

“… Harvard won’t go for this. Where are the liberal arts? What about discussing great ideas? Fine, go to Harvard for that. But it is time that some universities start paying attention to undergraduates in exactly this way, by helping them be what they want to be. No courses, just helping students attain skills and practical experience in what interests them.”
LINK

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Filed under curriculum, person: Roger Schank, Sudbury Schools and Sudbury Valley School, training vs academics

Why history and not botany?

“Why school subjects ever came to be standardized I cannot guess.  Why history and not botany?  Geography and not geology?  Maths and not civics?  I think the lesson may lie in the words of the old public-school headmaster: ‘It doesn’t matter what you teach a boy so long as he dislikes it.’  — A.S. Neill from p104 of Summerhill School: A New View of Childhood

“All that any child needs is the three Rs; the rest should be tools and clay and sports and theatre and paint and freedom. … I am not decrying learning.  But learning should only come after play.  And learning should not be deliberately seasoned with play to make it palatable.” p102

“Creators learn what they want to learn in order to have the tools that their originality and genius demand.  We do not know how much creation is killed in the classroom with its emphasis on learning.” p108

Summerhill School: A New View of Childhood by A. S. Neill

SEE ALSO: Guest Post by Jess
“…I’d just like to point out that the subjects that are chosen are, well, chosen…why biology and not botany, why algebra and not agriculture…”

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Common Core Critique from Diane Ravitch

http://dianeravitch.net/2014/05/02/my-reply-to-alexander-nazaryan-of-newsweek/

“[T]he U.S. government, including the U.S. Department of Education, is prohibited by law from taking any action that would direct, control, or supervise curriculum or instruction. … but it would be hard to find a teacher who would agree that neither Common Core nor the federally funded online tests has any effect on curriculum and instruction. Common Core and the related testing has had a dramatic effect on both. And, so, at risk of being called a name by Alexander, I would say (having worked for two years in the U.S. Department of Education) that the federal encouragement of Common Core and the federal funding of the Common Core tests directly conflicts with federal law.”

“In 2010, I was invited to the White House to meet with Melody Barnes, the director of domestic policy; Rahm Emanuel, the White House chief of staff; and Ricardo Rodriguez, the President’s education advisor, and they asked me what I thought of Common Core. I urged them to field test it. I suggested that they invite 3-5 states to give it a trial of three to five years. See how it works. See if it narrows the achievement gap or widens the achievement gap. They quickly dismissed the idea. They were in a hurry. They wanted Common Core to be rolled out as quickly as possible, without checking out how it works in real classrooms with real teachers and real children.”

“We are #1 among the rich nations of the world in child poverty; nearly one-quarter of our children live in poverty. Our kids who live in affluent communities do very well indeed on the international tests. If we reduced the proportion of children living in poverty, our international test scores would go up.”

SEE ALSO:
“…Stroup came to believe that the biggest portion of the test scores that hardly changed—that 72 percent—simply measured test-taking ability. For almost $100 million a year, Texas taxpayers were sold these tests as a gauge of whether schools are doing a good job.”
http://www.texasobserver.org/walter-stroup-standardized-testing-pearson/

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In the news…

“As for keeping up with the news I wonder what passes for “news.” Who played Mozart that day or composed a new symphony? Who wrote a beautiful poem? Who fell in love with their child that day? Who suffered of loss and pain? Who was born? Who died? Which bird finished its tour of the sky? Which penguin made it alive through the ice? How many people died of hunger? Who is suffering? Who is enslaved or abused? What games of joy and connection people played that day? Who had a new wise thought or a peaceful scientific discovery?… Most of what is happening in the world is not broadcasted.” — Naomi Aldort

See also:
Raising Our Children, Raising Ourselves, Naomi Aldort

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Filed under alternative education, attachment parenting, curriculum, news, Sudbury Schools and Sudbury Valley School