Global Warming: What’s the worst that can happen?

Even if the chances are something small like 0.1% or 1% or 5% that human-caused global warming/climate change is
1. happening
2. substantial
3. and there is something we can do about it

It is still worth taking action because it’s not that hard to take action and the risk that it is real is HUGE


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Filed under climate change, erik-green, green

We need new rules for biking / bikers

Reasonable ideas…

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Filed under bikes, erik-green, green

EU emission laws will impact US as well. In a good way.

For example… BMW sees the future vis-a-vis tough emmisions regulations in the EU and is moving more and more towards electric and plug-in hybrids. This will clearly impact the cars they offer in other parts of the world, and will also influence other automakers.
(By way of Paul Graham

I realize that the cars will only be as “green” as the electricity they use, but here is a US map that analyzes how green the electricity grid is when used for an all-electric car:

“… Below is a map of the updated regional estimates for global warming emissions for the 26 electricity grid regions across the US. Compared to our previous analysis, nearly every region of the country has improved emissions for EVs. ”

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Filed under car, erik-green, future, green

Patty McCord at Netflix — The Queen of the good good-byes and the future of work

This is an amazing story about the culture of Netflix and it’s clearly the future of (creative) work for better or worse. No set hours, unlimited time-off, etc. But “ruthless” (or simply more “real”/”honest”) in hiring/firing. Depends on your perspective! “A for effort” doesn’t count. (19 minute podcast from NPR’s Planet Money)

NETFLIX: “We’re a _team_, not a family” (Slide 23 of 124)

This reminds me of Byron Katie in “Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life” (BTW, I really recommend the audio cds.. really great!) where in Chapter 6 (pages 84-85) she talks about a boss firing an assistant because she wasn’t doing a good job even though they had been working together for many many years.

“People usually fire themselves when they realize what’s going on.”

IOW, it’s best to be clear and truthful about what is happening with the company — a person’s performance or the lack of a need for them (because of a change in technology or because the company has pivoted in some way)

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Filed under contrarian, evidence-based, future, talent vs skill, technology, uberification, work, work-life balance

Whatever you do, don’t go into debt for college

Excerpt from an interview with Ran Prieur at Boing Boing:

Avi: What advice would you give to a smart kid in high school right now?

Ran: My first advice would be: Whatever you do, don’t go into debt for college. This is a point about college that some people don’t understand. And that is, the main thing you learn in college is how to think and act like an educated person.

If your parents both went to college, then they raised you, then you already know how to think and act like an educated person. You don’t need to go to college to learn that. If you come from a lower class family and your parents did not go to college, then college is much more beneficial to you.

People who’ve been to college and learn to think and act that way get a lot more respect in the dominant society. Just the way you say words, the way you carry yourself. So that’s a big benefit of college. You don’t necessarily have to pay tuition to do that. You could learn that by osmosis. Hanging out in a college campus.

When I was in high school, I was completely unmotivated. I did not know how to motivate myself at all. I was just going through the motions. So I went to college because college was the thing to do. It was a lot cheaper back then in the late 80’s when I went to college. My parents had some money saved up so I didn’t have to go on debt for college.

But, boy, I would not want to be a smart kid in high school right now because unless you’re tremendously good at self motivating, it can be hard for you to quit high school and not go to college and find something to do and not just crash and burn.

Maybe I would say go to community college to get your basic stuff out of the way or hang out at a college campus. If you could get a staff job at a college campus, then you can kind of get the college experience, and even take a few classes.

I don’t know. I would not want to be a kid in high school right now. The generation that is coming up now is going to have a really tough time. Be adaptable, that’s the advice I’d give.

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Filed under advice, alternative education, college, person: Ran Prieur, raising kids / parenting, Sudbury Schools and Sudbury Valley School

It doesn’t matter if your kids love you or not. It’s not their job to love you. It’s your job to love them.

On the character Greg’s line: “It doesn’t matter if your kids love you or not. It’s not their job to love you. It’s your job to love them.”

Cody: That became kind of a mantra for me at a point in my life. It came to me when I was off shooting a different movie a few years ago, and my eldest son was 1 [year old] and he was so angry with me when I would come home — he wouldn’t come to me for a hug. He was genuinely clearly resentful of the fact that I had been gone. And it was gut-wrenching for me because I was a new mom, and it was not what I had pictured my life as a working mother to be like.

And so I just had to think of a way to remind myself that it doesn’t matter if he doesn’t come to you. That’s not what this is about. This is about you loving him and making him feel secure, and not vice versa. So that got me through a hard time, and then I wound up just popping it into a script later on.

From an interview with Diablo Cody about her new film “Ricki And The Flash” with Meryl Streep

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Filed under raising kids / parenting, unconditional love

Reporters, Journalists. How about this for your election coverage?

The Citizens Agenda in Campaign Coverage
Jay Rosen, August 15, 2010

“The idea is to learn from voters what those voters want the campaign to be about, and what they need to hear from the candidates to make a smart decision. So you go out and ask them: “What do you want the candidates to be discussing as they compete for votes in this year’s election?”

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Filed under news, politics